I Was Told There’d Be Cake

As I’ve mentioned before, I like to know how people come across any and all books they read.  While having lunch the other day with two amazing women blessings and discussing my weekly three-hour drives to see a loved one, they suggested I listen to audio books while travelling in the car.  Eureka!

The last time I can recall listening to audio books was when I drove three hours from grad school to home, which is a long time ago.  Thus, I was anxious to explore the offerings at our local library.  My squirts, now pros on two wheels, and I hopped onto the bike trail across the street from our house and found our way to Glen Carbon Centennial Library (in one piece, I might add).  Here I explored nearly four rows of books on cd, a welcome increase in selection from years past.

cakeaudioversion

A foodie at heart, the title which caught my eye was Sloane Crosley’s I Was Told There’d Be Cake, a New York Times bestseller.  A compilation of essays told in Crosley’s own voice, this was the ideal reintroduction to audio books for me.  I didn’t have to remember a cast of characters or settings.  Instead, I  only had to hone in on one nonfictional account at a time ranging from the mystery of the bowel movement found on the rug in her small New York bathroom to her near death experience with hemochromatosis (yes, I didn’t  know what this ailment was before listening either).

Crosley’s careful manipulation of words made me giggle aloud as I waited in my lane for prescriptions to be filled or checks to be cashed.  I even found myself more than a tidy bit miffed when the GPS lady interrupted as I was trying to drive to a new-to-me locale.

So, if it has been a while since you have listened to an audio book or never tried one before, pick up Crosley’s I Was Told There’d Be Cake and listen to her straightforward story told in her own words.

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Three Times Lucky

So, my oldest daughter finally passed over her copy of Sheila Turnage’s Three Times Lucky, the book her buddy Miss G. selected for their third-grade book club; I was not allowed to begin reading until she was completely finished.

Winner of the Newbery Honor Book, a New York Times Bestseller, an Edgar Award Finalist, and an E.B. White Read-Aloud Honor Book, my eyeballs were drooling at the thought of cracking open this book.

Immediately confronted with colorful characters such as the Colonel and Miss Lana as well as characters which will melt your heart as in protagonist Mo who gives vinegar bottles, full of notes addressed to her unknown mother, to the local townspeople who gladly throw them over bridges for her in the hopes they may find their way to her mother.

In fact, my hub was wearing a Heisenberg t-shirt the other day,  the one with Walter White’s face on the front, and my daughter proclaimed, “That man looks just like Detective Joe Starr!”  Starr, a male main character Mo didn’t like due to the “hook of his nose, or the plane of his cheekbones . . . [and] the way he didn’t smile”  (13).  Of course, I had to quickly turn my back to disguise the tears of joy running down my face at this unfolding, before those same eyeballs (mine), of literacy in action.

Three Times Lucky, while containing some heavy themes (domestic violence, alcoholism, murder), does so in a manner which is not only digestible for the young reader but also educational.

With my oldest looking forward to discussion of Turnage’s book at an actual cafe, Sgt. Pepper’s Cafe in Edwardsville, I am looking forward to witnessing firsthand the love of reading at this young age.

Update:  Discussion rocked at Sgt. Pepper’s Cafe.  Topics spanned from the many combinations which represent family to the yummy ice cream which topped off our savory lunches.  Yummers!

Next discussion:  Miss Kirstin’s pick of Magic Kitten:  A Summer Spell